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SPECIAL PROMOTION: FREE CALMING MIST & USA SHIPPING WITH $50 ORDER

SPECIAL PROMOTION: FREE CALMING MIST & USA SHIPPING WITH $50 ORDER

SPECIAL PROMOTION: FREE CALMING MIST & USA SHIPPING WITH $50 ORDER

SPECIAL PROMOTION: FREE CALMING MIST & USA SHIPPING WITH $50 ORDER

REFERENCE TOPICS

Cannabis

CBD/CBG Extracts | Oils | Powders, etc.

The part of the oil from the hemp plant that has been partitioned away from the THC psychoactive component is called CBD oil and is an industry in search of a market.

Orally, some have found various cannabis extracts work well with epileptic seizure control while others claim it is nothing short of a Lazarus miracle, relieving pain and woe. Most cannabis extracts do tend to make one drowsy.

As for skin, the Skin Dork has seen only entry level help in appearance and more often, just more trouble. It has no clearly defined mission, no discernible effects in the real world other than presenting what many other triglyceride oils do: an occlusive lubricant that can easily lead to acne breakouts.

CBD oil has been compared to Vitamin E and Vitamin D to decrease skin inflammation. In fact, Vitamin D topically is very inflammatory and Vitamin E, often described as an antioxidant, is actually a pro-oxidant when applied continually. So much for that comparison.

The unsaponifiable component of the oil is not biochemically interesting on the skin either, at least to the Skin Dork.

As for inflammatory acne, CBD oil has demonstrated no activity, plus or minus. Though there is a claim the powder extracts from cannabis may reduce skin oil production, but so does cellulose powder, which is lot less expensive, and natural, too.

Ozonated or oxygenated CBD oil is chemistry nonsense. Such a procedure would only increase peroxide levels and decrease fatty acid stability. How is that an advantage in any oil used for skincare?

The uptake of THC in skin or by ingestion (smoking, dietary) has shown it depletes Vitamin C – so if you are using THC, keep your dietary vitamin C up. The Skin Dork would not advise increasing Vitamin C topicals to compensate. The skin receptors for Vitamin C can quickly reduce in population and the skin will weaken from the topical dependency created.

The Skin Dork does not oppose cannabis oils, powders and elixirs, they’re just not in his tool chest.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

REFERENCE TOPICS

Cannabis

CBD/CBG Extracts | Oils | Powders, etc.

The part of the oil from the hemp plant that has been partitioned away from the THC psychoactive component is called CBD oil and is an industry in search of a market.

Orally, some have found various cannabis extracts work well with epileptic seizure control while others claim it is nothing short of a Lazarus miracle, relieving pain and woe. Most cannabis extracts do tend to make one drowsy.

As for skin, the Skin Dork has seen only entry level help in appearance and more often, just more trouble. It has no clearly defined mission, no discernible effects in the real world other than presenting what many other triglyceride oils do: an occlusive lubricant that can easily lead to acne breakouts.

CBD oil has been compared to Vitamin E and Vitamin D to decrease skin inflammation. In fact, Vitamin D topically is very inflammatory and Vitamin E, often described as an antioxidant, is actually a pro-oxidant when applied continually. So much for that comparison.

The unsaponifiable component of the oil is not biochemically interesting on the skin either, at least to the Skin Dork.

As for inflammatory acne, CBD oil has demonstrated no activity, plus or minus. Though there is a claim the powder extracts from cannabis may reduce skin oil production, but so does cellulose powder, which is lot less expensive, and natural, too.

Ozonated or oxygenated CBD oil is chemistry nonsense. Such a procedure would only increase peroxide levels and decrease fatty acid stability. How is that an advantage in any oil used for skincare?

The uptake of THC in skin or by ingestion (smoking, dietary) has shown it depletes Vitamin C – so if you are using THC, keep your dietary vitamin C up. The Skin Dork would not advise increasing Vitamin C topicals to compensate. The skin receptors for Vitamin C can quickly reduce in population and the skin will weaken from the topical dependency created.

The Skin Dork does not oppose cannabis oils, powders and elixirs, they’re just not in his tool chest.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

REFERENCE TOPICS

Cannabis

CBD/CBG Extracts | Oils | Powders, etc.

The part of the oil from the hemp plant that has been partitioned away from the THC psychoactive component is called CBD oil and is an industry in search of a market.

Orally, some have found various cannabis extracts work well with epileptic seizure control while others claim it is nothing short of a Lazarus miracle, relieving pain and woe. Most cannabis extracts do tend to make one drowsy.

As for skin, the Skin Dork has seen only entry level help in appearance and more often, just more trouble. It has no clearly defined mission, no discernible effects in the real world other than presenting what many other triglyceride oils do: an occlusive lubricant that can easily lead to acne breakouts.

CBD oil has been compared to Vitamin E and Vitamin D to decrease skin inflammation. In fact, Vitamin D topically is very inflammatory and Vitamin E, often described as an antioxidant, is actually a pro-oxidant when applied continually. So much for that comparison.

The unsaponifiable component of the oil is not biochemically interesting on the skin either, at least to the Skin Dork.

As for inflammatory acne, CBD oil has demonstrated no activity, plus or minus. Though there is a claim the powder extracts from cannabis may reduce skin oil production, but so does cellulose powder, which is lot less expensive, and natural, too.

Ozonated or oxygenated CBD oil is chemistry nonsense. Such a procedure would only increase peroxide levels and decrease fatty acid stability. How is that an advantage in any oil used for skincare?

The uptake of THC in skin or by ingestion (smoking, dietary) has shown it depletes Vitamin C – so if you are using THC, keep your dietary vitamin C up. The Skin Dork would not advise increasing Vitamin C topicals to compensate. The skin receptors for Vitamin C can quickly reduce in population and the skin will weaken from the topical dependency created.

The Skin Dork does not oppose cannabis oils, powders and elixirs, they’re just not in his tool chest.

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