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SPECIAL PROMOTION: FREE CALMING MIST & USA SHIPPING WITH $50 ORDER

SPECIAL PROMOTION: FREE CALMING MIST & USA SHIPPING WITH $50 ORDER

SPECIAL PROMOTION: FREE CALMING MIST & USA SHIPPING WITH $50 ORDER

SPECIAL PROMOTION: FREE CALMING MIST & USA SHIPPING WITH $50 ORDER

REFERENCE TOPICS

Enzymes in Skincare Products

There are two predominant enzymes used in skincare: they are both proteases (pro – tee – aaze): bromelain and papain. They are both naturally derived. When applied topically they debride dead tissue and cells and are used to clean up wounds.

For esthetics, these enzymes are used to exfoliate, similar to what salicylic acid does in targeting non-functional cells and tissue substances. The choice of enzymes is centered on the desire to avoid the harsh effects of salicylic acid and hopefully also avoid inflammation.

This often doesn’t work well to gain a smooth even effect. Also, enzymes can be very irritating, causing intense itching for long periods after application. This does not always occur and some people are more susceptible than others to this response. Using these enzymes requires a very thorough cleansing process afterward so as to remove all traces.

Papain derived from papaya is the stronger of the two by far and often will be combined with urea in quasi-drug formulations.

Since 2015 the FDA has banned the use of papain topically because of adverse effects which sometimes occur to living cells.

Bromelain derived from pineapple is more benign, milder and is often found as an exfoliant in skincare. It also must be thoroughly washed away to avoid itching afterward.

The problem here, again, is that enzymes tend to be very uneven in outcome. You may find an overall smoothing but patches here and there remain and require another application. Concentration levels in the topical bromelain solution are not predictable – it is after all a natural product and can vary considerably even from the same processor, who may or may not measure the activity level with any accuracy. Activity is not always a function of concentration. Storage issues play a role here also.

If it works for you it is better than acids, so experimenting makes sense.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

REFERENCE TOPICS

Enzymes in Skincare Products

There are two predominant enzymes used in skincare: they are both proteases (pro – tee – aaze): bromelain and papain. They are both naturally derived. When applied topically they debride dead tissue and cells and are used to clean up wounds.

For esthetics, these enzymes are used to exfoliate, similar to what salicylic acid does in targeting non-functional cells and tissue substances. The choice of enzymes is centered on the desire to avoid the harsh effects of salicylic acid and hopefully also avoid inflammation.

This often doesn’t work well to gain a smooth even effect. Also, enzymes can be very irritating, causing intense itching for long periods after application. This does not always occur and some people are more susceptible than others to this response. Using these enzymes requires a very thorough cleansing process afterward so as to remove all traces.

Papain derived from papaya is the stronger of the two by far and often will be combined with urea in quasi-drug formulations.

Since 2015 the FDA has banned the use of papain topically because of adverse effects which sometimes occur to living cells.

Bromelain derived from pineapple is more benign, milder and is often found as an exfoliant in skincare. It also must be thoroughly washed away to avoid itching afterward.

The problem here, again, is that enzymes tend to be very uneven in outcome. You may find an overall smoothing but patches here and there remain and require another application. Concentration levels in the topical bromelain solution are not predictable – it is after all a natural product and can vary considerably even from the same processor, who may or may not measure the activity level with any accuracy. Activity is not always a function of concentration. Storage issues play a role here also.

If it works for you it is better than acids, so experimenting makes sense.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

REFERENCE TOPICS

Enzymes in Skincare Products

There are two predominant enzymes used in skincare: they are both proteases (pro – tee – aaze): bromelain and papain. They are both naturally derived. When applied topically they debride dead tissue and cells and are used to clean up wounds.

For esthetics, these enzymes are used to exfoliate, similar to what salicylic acid does in targeting non-functional cells and tissue substances. The choice of enzymes is centered on the desire to avoid the harsh effects of salicylic acid and hopefully also avoid inflammation.

This often doesn’t work well to gain a smooth even effect. Also, enzymes can be very irritating, causing intense itching for long periods after application. This does not always occur and some people are more susceptible than others to this response. Using these enzymes requires a very thorough cleansing process afterward so as to remove all traces.

Papain derived from papaya is the stronger of the two by far and often will be combined with urea in quasi-drug formulations.

Since 2015 the FDA has banned the use of papain topically because of adverse effects which sometimes occur to living cells.

Bromelain derived from pineapple is more benign, milder and is often found as an exfoliant in skincare. It also must be thoroughly washed away to avoid itching afterward.

The problem here, again, is that enzymes tend to be very uneven in outcome. You may find an overall smoothing but patches here and there remain and require another application. Concentration levels in the topical bromelain solution are not predictable – it is after all a natural product and can vary considerably even from the same processor, who may or may not measure the activity level with any accuracy. Activity is not always a function of concentration. Storage issues play a role here also.

If it works for you it is better than acids, so experimenting makes sense.

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